Books › Other books › From Bondage to Contract: Wage Labor, Marriage, and the Market in the Age of Slave Emancipation by Amy Dru Stanley (1998-11-13)

From Bondage to Contract: Wage Labor, Marriage, and the Market in the Age of Slave Emancipation by Amy Dru Stanley (1998-11-13) Amy Dru Stanley(Author)

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Book From Bondage to Contract: Wage Labor, Marriage, and the Market in the Age of Slave Emancipation by Amy Dru Stanley (1998-11-13)

From Bondage to Contract: Wage Labor, Marriage, and the Market in the Age of Slave Emancipation by Amy Dru Stanley (1998-11-13)

Available in PDF - DJVU Format | From Bondage to Contract: Wage Labor, Marriage, and the Market in the Age of Slave Emancipation by Amy Dru Stanley (1998-11-13).pdf

 

Original name book: From Bondage to Contract: Wage Labor, Marriage, and the Market in the Age of Slave Emancipation by Amy Dru Stanley (1998-11-13)

Pages: Unknown

Language: Unknown

Publisher: Cambridge University Press (1743)

By: Amy Dru Stanley(Author)

Book details


Format *An electronic version of a printed book that can be read on a computer or handheld device designed specifically for this purpose. *Report a Broken Link

PDF
Required Software Any PDF Reader, Apple Preview
Supported Devices Windows PC/PocketPC, Mac OS, Linux OS, Apple iPhone/iPod Touch.
# of Devices Unlimited
Flowing Text / Pages Pages
Printable? Yes

Category - Other books

Bestsellers rank - 6 Rating Star

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Customer Reviews
  • By Mary Ann Tetreault on December 28, 2000

    This excellent study of nineteenth-century American households brings Hannah Arendt's assessment of the home as a place of labor and violence clearly into view. Amy Dru Stanley looks at the spread of contractarianism into household relations and finds not improvement but rather a different basis for wringing effort from subordinates to enrich and comfort their masters. Defenders of the south's peculiar institution used similar arguments with regard to labor, comparing the "wage slaves" in the north to the real slaves of the south, always in favor of the latter. Stanley's assessment is more nuanced, valuing individual freedom while remaining sensitive to the grinding hardships this freedom brought with it. The heart of her argument is her close analysis of the relations of dependency between slaves and masters and husbands and their wives and children. While the movement to free slaves had widespread support among many social groups, the movement to free wives, like today's movement to free children, was seen very differently. Indeed, slave emancipators held out the prospect to freedmen of being kings in their own castles, of holding their wives and children in bondage to themselves just as their white masters held their slaves and the members of their own families, to encourage them to leave their masters following emancipation. Yet for the freedmen, the money to be kings in their castles was lacking, and freedwomen had to labor as long and hard in freedom as they had in bondage to keep their poor households going. As a result, many resisted playing their assigned parts in the freedmen's family romance. Meanwhile, their poor white sisters faced similar economic constraints. Free labor during the era governed by the "iron law of wages" condemned workers' families to penury and, in extreme cases, pushed wives and daughters into prostitution as their only alternative to destitution. Stanley's informative discussion of the personal cost of commodification of labor to individuals and their families provides many opportunities to consider other results of this process on human existence.

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